50 Fascinating Facts About Grenada

Grenada is a Caribbean Island nation made up of one central island and six smaller islands. To the north, it has Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Barbados to the northeast, Trinidad, and Tobago to the south, Venezuela to the west, and Curacao to the west of it.

Fascinating Facts

1
There are gorgeous beaches, lush woods, and famous underwater beauty on this Caribbean volcanic island. Here are a few fun facts about the country of the same name.
2
Concepcion was the name given to the island by Christopher Columbus when it was found in 1498. The island was renamed Mayo by a new group of explorers a year later. It was initially named "Le Grenade" by the French, but that was changed to Grenada by the British.
3
Grenadines brag about being home to the first underwater sculpture park in the world. More than 65 human sculptures may be seen in the Moliniere Underwater Sculpture Park, which is located off the coast of Italy. Snorkelling, scuba diving, or transparent glass bottom boats are all excellent ways to see these underwater works of art.
4
Due to Grenada's abundance of spices, the island is often referred to as the "Island of Spice". Nutmeg trees were planted on the island when passengers from the East Indies to England made a pit call. Nutmeg has been one of the country's most important exports in the last few decades. If you look closely at the country's flag, you'll notice a little patch of green with the word "Nutmeg" in it to the left of the middle.
5
The country's citizens are prohibited from wearing any camouflage. The army is the only one allowed to use the mask.
6
The devastation caused by Hurricane Ivan in September 2004 was a national tragedy for Grenada.
7
Leatherback turtles lay their eggs on the dunes around the nation. Three extant reptiles are heavier than these ancient turtles, dating back to when dinosaurs roamed the earth. Only 35,000 female turtles remain in the wild, making them one of the most endangered animals on the planet. Every 1,000 eggs that hatch, just one makes it to adulthood.
8
SONAR has been unable to detect the bottom of Grenada's Grand Etang Lake, which has been dubbed a "bottomless lake." The lake has been a famous tourist destination since it was built atop a long-dormant volcano. As well as the Loch Ness monster mythology, it's said that lovely mermaids have been seen swimming in the water there.
9
Almost ninety per cent of Grenada's houses were either destroyed or damaged by Hurricane Ivan in September 2004.
10
From 1958 to 1962, Grenada was a member of the Federation of the West Indies (FWI).
11
The British seized possession of the island after the French. The British saw the island's potential and worked hard to use the sugar cane that was grown there.
12
Nutmeg, mace, and other spices are grown on Grenada, known as the "Island of Spice."
13
In other words, the name Grenada is derived from the Spanish word for "pomegranate," Granada.
14
In 1498, Christopher Columbus gave the island the name "Concepcion."
15
Grenada is an island nation made up of six smaller ones.
16
The Zika virus has spread to Grenada, too. In May 2016, a new instance of the disease was discovered in Grenada.
17
According to a recent study, dark chocolate has been shown to help lower blood sugar levels and reduce stress.
18
The River Antoine Rum Distillery in Grenada is the Caribbean's oldest operating water-propelled distillery.
19
The island remained uninhabited for over a century after Columbus' visit.
20
Grenada's leading trading partner is the United States of America. Grenadians rely heavily on U.S. imports for the bulk of their needs.
21
Since the military budget in Grenada is low, law enforcement officials from Grenada undergo military training in other nations.
22
Cuba and the United Kingdom are both engaged in supporting Grenadan students with scholarships and exchange opportunities.
23
Grenada is also the only place in the world where you can find all three varieties of cocoa. To learn more about different kinds of cocoa, visit Grenada's House of Chocolates. It's in St. George, the country's capital.
24
Grenada's nutmeg business began when a ship carrying goods from the East Indies to England abandoned some nutmeg trees on the island. As a result, it now provides approximately 40% of the yearly global harvest.
25
The tiny island nation relies on rich tuna fisheries, which it runs with the aid of just 85 vessels, to keep its economy afloat. Every year, they manage to catch tuna worth tens of millions of dollars. However, despite the lucrative nature of the industry, pirates, and other scavengers from across the water sometimes steal the ships' cargo.
26
Unbeknownst to many, Grenada is the name of a Mississippian city in Grenada County.
27
Woods nearly entirely cover the island country of Grenada, yet it is devoid of any dangerous snakes. That's correct, of course!
28
Grenada is a Caribbean Island country in the West Indies. Grenada declared its independence from the United Kingdom in 1974, and Eric Gairy was elected as its first premier.
29
This spicy stew composed of indigenous vegetables, salty pork and fragrant spices has become the national cuisine of Grenada.
30
Grand Etang Lake, according to folklore, has no bottom. Some residents believe that those who drown on the lake turn up in St Vincent, Trinidad, or Venezuela.
31
Even though the nation is nearly entirely covered in trees, no poisonous snakes can be found there.
32
The Antoine River, which runs through the area. The Caribbean's first water-driven distillery, Rum Distillery, has been in operation for over a century. Since 1785, the distillery has been supplying Grenada with rum.
33
Snorkelers and scuba divers go to Grenada's Underwater Sculpture Marine Park, which features incredible underwater sculptures.
34
Grenada's official language is English, but the island's native French Patois is widely spoken.
35
Grenade is known as the "Island of Spice" because of the enormous amount of nutmeg and other spices produced on the island.
36
A delectable stew made with meat, veggies, and dumplings simmered in coconut milk, herbs, and spices is known as 'Oil down' in Grenada.
37
Hurricane Ivan in September 2004 damaged or destroyed almost 90% of Grenada's houses; it was a tragedy for the island country.
38
From 1958 to 1962, Grenada was a member of the Federation of the West Indies (FWI).
39
The British seized possession of the island after the French. The British saw the island's potential and made a concerted effort to develop sugar cane fields on it.
40
Nutmeg, mace, and other spices are grown on Grenada, known as the "Island of Spice."
41
Jumpers Hill may be found in Grenada. During the French invasion of Grenada, the Caribs (early occupants of Grenada) were pursued to the top of the hill, where they were given the moniker "Cape Fear." When the Caribs finally made it to the crest of the hill, they realized they had no way back down. They were killed when they leapt from the cliff.
42
"Pomegranate" is the Spanish word for Grenada, which is likely the origin of the name.
43
Grenada's national bird is the Grenada dove, a critically endangered species.
44
The country of ten thousand islands Grenada is an archipelago made up of six smaller islands.
45
Despite lying on the southern border of the Grenadines, where storms typically pass through, Grenada has only been struck by three hurricanes in the last 50 years.
46
The island nation's national dish is referred to as "oil down." Coconut milk is used for cooking food until it is fully absorbed.
47
For the first time, an underwater sculpture park was built in Grenada. The sculptures are made from concrete and rebar and put in a natural setting without harming the reef or the lives of the creatures who dwell there.
48
According to a recent study, dark chocolate has been shown to help lower blood sugar levels and reduce stress.
49
River Antoine Rum Distillery in Grenada is the Caribbean's oldest operating water-propelled distillery.
50
The island remained uninhabited for over a century after Columbus' visit.

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