50 Fascinating Facts About South Sudan

Located in East-Central Africa, South Sudan is a landlocked country. South Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo border it on the north, while the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo share their eastern and southern borders. Central Africa is home to South Sudan. After a long period of clan warfare, it split away from Sudan and established an independent state. The ten southernmost states of Sudan comprise South Sudan.<br /> Christianity and Islam are the two most common religions in the nation. However, most people in the nation are Christian. A ceasefire with the northern part of Sudan was struck in 2005, and South Sudan became an independent state in July 2011 after a 97 percent vote for independence. Since gaining its freedom, the country has been through nothing but turmoil. Even though the country is wealthy in natural resources, it is plagued by poverty and starvation. Some of the most exciting tidbits regarding South Sudan may be found here.

50 Fascinating Facts

1
South Sudan is the world's newest country. It is a country in Central Africa with roughly 11 million people, nearly the size of France.
2
South Sudan's capital city is Juba. Juba is the capital and largest city of Juba County, which is located on the White Nile. In addition, it serves as the administrative center for the Central Equatorial region.
3
All kinds of wildlife may be found at Boma National Park near the Ethiopian border, including a herd of over a million Mongalla gazelle and white-eared kob, as well as other species.
4
South Sudan is Africa's most linguistically diverse country. It is made up of many languages.
5
Oil was found in the southwest of Sudan in 1977. In the 1980s and 1990s, a civil conflict thwarted significant oil exploration and development.
6
South Sudanese non-literate people have a robust oral history as a cultural manifestation.
7
Sudan, one of Africa's largest, was split in two to establish South Sudan.
8
Many ecologists are traveling to South Sudan, yet there is no tourism infrastructure, paved roads, or reliable communications.
9
The Dinka make up most South Sudan's 200 ethnic groupings. The Shilluk, Nuer, Acholi, and Lotuhu are among the other tribes.
10
Nimule, a tiny national park in South Sudan was formerly home to the white rhino, now extinct.
11
In Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda, many South Sudanese who left the civil war could connect with the natives and acquire their languages and cultures.
12
South Sudan's ethnic groups and regions all have distinct styles of traditional clothing. It's common for clothes to be loose-fitting and light because of the hot weather.
13
Spasmodic civil battles raged throughout the nation for 50 years. In 2005, North Sudan and South Sudan finally agreed to a ceasefire, ending their decades-long civil war.
14
It's interesting to note that the South Sudanese administration explored various names, including Nile Republic, Azania, and the Kush Republic, before settling on Sudan. The Republic of South Sudan, popularly known as Ross, was chosen as the safest option.
15
NBA stars Manute Bol and Luol Deng, both of whom came from Southern Sudan, were born there.
16
Many ecologists are traveling to South Sudan, yet there is no tourism infrastructure, paved roads, or reliable communications.
17
All kinds of wildlife may be found at Boma National Park near the Ethiopian border, including a herd of over a million Mongalla gazelle and white-eared kob, as well as other species.
18
In terms of age, it is one of the newest countries on the planet. When South Sudan broke away from Sudan in 2011, it became an independent nation for the first time.
19
South Sudan is Africa's most linguistically diverse country. It is made up of many languages.
20
In terms of landmass, it was Africa's largest country before its secession from Sudan. The Christian and tribal administration of South Sudan contrasts with the Islamic Sharia rule of North Sudan.
21
Tickets, or round stick and mud buildings, are home to about 83% of the country's inhabitants. These old-fashioned shacks usually have thatched roofs, no windows, and are rather tall.
22
The white rhino once roamed the tiny but stunning Nimule National Park. Currently, there are many hippos, Ugandan kob, buffalo, and elephants living in the area.
23
The youngest country in the world, South Sudan, was only created in 1951. There was a brutal civil war leading up to its 2011 declaration of independence from Sudan.
24
The country's economy is built around its vast oil reserves, inherited from its former colonial masters. However, because Sudan is a landlocked nation, practically all of its pipelines pass through it. A short halt has rocked the economy in oil production following a conflict with Sudan in 2012.
25
Counting the number of cattle owned by a household in South Sudan is considered a sign of affluence. If more than one guy is interested in his daughter, it is not uncommon for a man to offer him cattle in exchange for her hand in marriage.
26
There are more than 60 indigenous languages spoken in South Sudan due to the country's ethnic diversity.
27
In most communities across the country, sharing a meal is an everyday habit. People desire to be near to their loved ones and spend as much time as possible with them.
28
Due to the civil conflicts, many individuals have been forced to flee their homes. There were around 7 million people in Sudan that required humanitarian aid as of 2019.
29
South Sudan is one of the most impoverished countries in the world. The ongoing depreciation of the country's currency directly results from the civil war's economic toll. In the current situation, it has the world's lowest GDP per capita.
30
Most people live on less than a dollar a day in rural regions, and most of them are poor. Poor sanitation is the norm in the places where people live in thatched-roof dwellings. Eighty percent of people do not have access to a toilet.
31
The education and healthcare systems in the country are likewise deplorable. The illiteracy rate in South Sudan is the highest in the world. Only 16% of South Sudanese children attend school, and only 1.9 percent of those students finish primary school in their country.
32
'Independent' was the name given to a baby boy born after South Sudan gained its independence. However, one year after his birth, the youngster passed away.
33
Giraffes, buffalos, lions, elephants, and hartebeests abound in South Sudan, home to many other species.
34
Landlocked South Sudan is in Africa. This means that landlocked countries do not have access to the open sea.
35
Since the Mesolithic era, the region of Sudan known as Ancient Nubia has been inhabited.
36
South Sudan was a component of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan from 1899 to 1955 and was ruled jointly by the British and the Egyptians.
37
South Sudan became the world's newest recognized country in 2011 after Sudan was divided into two countries.
38
When this occurred, Sudan had been embroiled in an ongoing civil war from 1955 to 1972 between an anti-government rebel movement and the government.
39
In the South Sudanese flag, two white lines divide horizontal black, red, and green stripes.
40
According to a legend, the Bari people of South Sudan go by the name of Juba.
41
South Sudan is one of Africa's most linguistically varied countries, having hundreds of language groups.
42
South Sudan is home to the Nile, the world's longest river.
43
South Sudan is home to more than 60 distinct ethnic groups.
44
The air quality in South Sudan is among the worst in the world.
45
In the 19th century, South Sudan was a vital center of the Arab slave trade.
46
There are serious worries concerning the population of South Sudan because of the country's ongoing civil conflict.
47
Even though the country is rich in oil, it has a low GDP.
48
The education and healthcare systems in this nation are appalling.
49
Christianity and Islam are the two most common religions in the nation.
50
The way you welcome someone is very significant in South Sudanese culture.

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